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  1. #91
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,295

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I'd like to see the Dove pic.

    I think the continuous trapeze idea was a Flying Dutchman system.

    The keyball alternative was suggested here, years ago when I first said I planned to trapeze the Osprey singlehanded, and folk mentioned that I'd be opening the door for the trap-hook to tangle in the lazyjacks and other lines as the boat inverts. I took that seriously, and I reckon the keyball is a good solution. I've never seen a hook break a hull either, but it isn't inconceivable.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    ...


    A good list, thanks. I have no deck-mounted mast-ram to press back on the gooseneck; and I've several demons in the tension/rake department, each being tackled tentatively. Although, somebody lately said that the whole ability of the mast to flex spilling wind, first assumes that there's enough ballast aboard to prevent the boat heeling sooner than the mast can bend...

    ...and in the moderate conditions which are mostly too much, the mast may not be very flexible. I must just live with that.

    The range of camber that you mention, encourages me to really pull on the sail controls. Strangely though, when I reef the sail, the remaining very small (upper) area looks extremely flat, and I always expect it will be effortless to control. She still heels a lot!



    You mean...like this?



    This was something I was coming to, ahead of your mentioning it. The foot of my mainsail is decidedly full and flabby, and tying that clew hard down to the boom definitely reduces fullness. I had assumed it was for tightening up the leech, but I didn't know why...
    ...
    There might be chocks instead of a ram, but you'll be leaving them out to encourage a bit of bend.
    That 'flattening reef' or flattener in a dinghy leech is there for two reasons.
    1) It lifts the boom when sailing with a lot of mast rake, keeps the clew out of the waves.
    (also means you can use a serious lot of rake before the boom hits the hoop, the tiller or hopefully, the helmsman.)
    2) It flattens the lower part of the sail, without pulling the clew beyond the black band. So the foot can be cut bigger and fuller, within the class rules.
    The clew slider really needs to be in the track, or at least lash the clew around the boom to send the leech tension where the sailmaker intended.

    Generally, when overpowered, use more rake, but get the sail shape as best you can first.

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,295

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    There might be chocks instead of a ram, but you'll be leaving them out to encourage a bit of bend.
    That 'flattening reef' lifts the boom when sailing with a lot of mast rake, keeps the clew out of the waves...
    This is SO helpful. I'm very grateful.

    I've always fitted as many chocks in front of the mast as there was room for, given the rake - so I've actually been over-chocking the gap and preventing the mast bending at deck level. Never occurred to me...I thought they needed stuffing in there.

    And I've often looked at the end of the boom while sailing and been conscious that if I heel a few more degrees, the end will hit the water and it'll be all over. That flattener has been staring me in the face every time I've gone out, but I've always set the sail with the foot too full and bloated. Not any more.

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    8,331

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Dan
    Out of interest, Have you ever tried sailing a proper single handed performance dinghy ie a Blaze or a Phantom etc?
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,295

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Not recently enough to recall what I might have learned. Laser/Europe in recent years, not what I'd call high performance...

    ...think I tried a Contender, 25 years ago at East Head, but it's a hazy memory.

    The Phantom appeals to me as a really good-looking, simple powerful machine, but I believe I'm hopelessly underweight for it.

    My knowledge of the Blaze is limited to unhappy memories of watching our generally very able club commodore capsize repeatedly until he lowered the sail and we towed him in, with the RIB.

    I can see that a big efficient sail driving a minimum-weight hull (assuming it is all competently set up) more easily converts a breeze into forward thrust, than a heavy hull like the Wayfarer or Osprey, under a compromised sail-plan, struggling to reduce heeling...

    ...and it's logical that the wind's force is more easily directed into forward motion than heeling, aboard a light, efficient design.

    I watch A-class cats and Musto skiffs setting off from the beach with the sail neither flapping nor pulling...the singlehanded helm isn't even hiking - just securing his water-bottle or bending over the stern to lower his rudder, finishing his sandwich...

    ...and the sail seems to be in neutral, until the helm is ready to turn up the heat. No stress or noise, no hint of uncontrolled power hustling the helm into activity. I don't know if that shows the subtle brilliance of those boats' designs, or the newness of their sails, or just their users' abilities, but I blame myself more than the Osprey, for the fact I haven't managed the same relaxed control, yet.

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    8,331

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    The thing is Dan that you are playing with something that really is never ever going to sail well single handed. It is OK saying that you like fiddling about with string etc but do you want to go sailing or just stand on the shore fiddling & loosing out. Talk of playing about with trapezes, baggy mains etc is just b......x you will never sail it well.

    I have a Phantom for when I am not cruiser sailing - I have to as my son is the class chairman- & the difference when you get into a boat that is properly designed for the job is like chalk & cheese. It is just so good to get into a properly set up boat that simply works- It is his old one so mine is rigged right. One just sheets in & goes. Reaching is just so exhilarating. it is like sailboarding in a way.
    My son is Ok weight for his Phantom & deliberately lost 4 stone to become more competitive. So weight does not have to be excessive.
    He tells me that Ovington has just built 8 more hulls so there is demand for new ones so the class is active. This means that replacement boats will move down the line & older ones will drop out the bottom of the chain soon at lower prices

    But you can always try a Blaze. Some of our club sailors dislike them as they are said to be really hard on the knees, but they are OK for lighter sailors. Forget Musto skiffs they will be too difficult for a starter as will Contenders & some of the RS versions with outriggers.
    Be careful of boats that need too much time on the knees. The Phantom can be a bit hard, but not so bad as someSH dinghies.
    But just park the Osprey up for a while & have a go at a decent boat - not some old dog---- You may not want to go back
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  7. #97
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Or find a crew?

    There are loads of singlehanders to choose from.
    Mate of mine has just bought an old Laser for a few hundred quid, spent a few evenings with a pot of gelcoat and it looks sorted now.

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    27,552

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I had an Osprey and found her fine to handle solo in light winds inc spinnaker, and with a novice crew sailed her from Chichester to Cowes and back, using our buoyancy aids as fenders, staying at a friends' place overnight and sitting the next morning in our jockey shorts at the launderette while the tumble dryer warmed our wetsuits.

    In heavy going it would definitley require modifications including a reefing system - a novice chum fell in love with an Osprey just by her looks - who wouldn't - and by pure luck we managed to find an Osprey main with three reefs built in, so someone had the idea before.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,295

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Thanks for that, Daydream, and all you gents. Interesting reading about the Phantom...I rather admire the muscular simplicity of the boat, although I think I will enjoy trapezing more than hiking, once I've got the hang of it.

    The Osprey's hull form stability seems greater than something like a Contender...and the Osp's mainsail is smaller than the Contender's, so I'm reasoning that trapezing the bigger, wider, heavier Osprey will be easier to learn, than on a Cont.

    I think the 'which dinghy' question pulls at very different desires and requirements. I'm an unusual dinghy sailor because I've never raced, nor do I expect to begin racing; yet I'm having fun (and quite often frustrating myself) in a design which was singlemindedly intended to satisfy top racers. But I really doubt I'd want to own whichever dinghy would give me the fullest sailing experience...

    ...there are lots of modern, lightweight, angular plastic designs which certainly look slick, and which interest me about as much as a sack of golf-clubs. Probably a joy to sail, but mostly designed to race energetically for short periods with maximum efficiency, then be easily hauled out and stored ready for the next race. They're the pure, carefully-specified solutions to a question I didn't ask.

    I still want a cruising yacht. That part of me might have bought a Wayfarer if I'd seen one cheap, back when I bought the Osprey...and a Wayfarer's mass, space and famed stability might have served my idle cruising plans better than the oversized ex-racing Osp...

    ...and I could easily pick up a good Laser, with all four different rig sizes for different wind strengths. I admit, that's almost tempting, because there is absolutely no pretence of the Laser being any use for anything except drip-dry fun.

    But the great benefit in the Osprey (as I see it) is her scale and complexity and the opportunities for learning and mastering yachty stuff without having a yacht. Her age makes me fearless about drilling holes or attaching items that Mr Proctor never specified, yet I still have a boat that can sail beautifully on days when I can manage her, and whose looks make me happy even when I can't.

    As you say, the Osp was never designed to sail properly with so little weight aboard. I'm not in denial about that, but I reckon I can do much more and better than I've managed so far. That's the target, not beyond reason I hope, especially with hints from you guys.

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    27,552

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Well Said !
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

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