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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    953

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Wayfarers. They're great! I used to instruct in them in the 80's at Emsworth Sailing School and my brother has owned two wooden ones.

    Reasonably fast, predictable, seaworthy, easily righted by a novice, easily sailed with all three sails with no rudder. Also, good and very tactical to race and ideal/safe to take your family out in. I'd have one over a Kestrel any day, although I'd consider the Kestrel a more racey boat.

    Yes, when capsized they do ship water in the way that every boat of that era does, get your crew to hold onto the lower toestraps as you stand on the centreboard and bring it back up. They will displace some water meaning that the boat may not float higher initially but you will have a few less buckets of bailing to do. The only nightmares occurred in the mk1/mk2 boats where the stern hatch popped off because it wasn't correctly clipped down.

    Oh yes, it is also the class where I had my first spinnaker blow out: the way every spinnaker should bow out! :-) If your centreboard or rudder hummed at speed then it is badly shaped: today's good racingfoils won't do this.

    Remove the rear wooden seats by all means but leave the floorboards in. They help a little with the stiffness and are much nicer to walk on. A pump and bucket are good ideas, even is the bucket is used just for the spinnaker when lowered.

    And the boat's weight? It is what it is. Get someone to help you up the slipway. Remember that the Laser 5000 weighs the same.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Emsworth Hants
    Posts
    11,873

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Wayfarers are great boats we have sailed them. A couple coast hopped a Wayfarer from the UK to the Med

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Campbeltown
    Posts
    1,549

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    for the Wayfarer devotees. Read this sobering tale.

    http://www.bluedome.co.uk/beginners/capsize.html
    Blow wind, rise storm,
    Ship ashore before dawn.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    953

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by EdWingfield View Post
    for the Wayfarer devotees. Read this sobering tale.

    http://www.bluedome.co.uk/beginners/capsize.html
    Yep, and my friend Chris and I on the same course in 2011, but less drama: https://youtu.be/BFUaayENfno

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Campbeltown
    Posts
    1,549

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Nice vid.

    Their report gave winds f5-6. Dinghy folk can exaggerate. Your vid doesn't show f5-6. Their radio and flares were inaccessible. In their report I could not identify who was 'in command'. It was a Committee. The report said they had witnessed 100+ Wayfarer capsize exercises - presumably all of them in duckpond situations?

    Thanks to a passing yottie, the military and the RNLI, all lived to tell the tale.
    Blow wind, rise storm,
    Ship ashore before dawn.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    953

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by EdWingfield View Post
    Nice vid.

    Their report gave winds f5-6. Dinghy folk can exaggerate. Your vid doesn't show f5-6. Their radio and flares were inaccessible. In their report I could not identify who was 'in command'. It was a Committee. The report said they had witnessed 100+ Wayfarer capsize exercises - presumably all of them in duckpond situations?

    Thanks to a passing yottie, the military and the RNLI, all lived to tell the tale.
    Hmmm. I didn’t realise there was a competition.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,296

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I read that rather frightening Isle of Wight Wayfarer tale with interest. I think anyone who fancies cruising an unballasted boat in open water needs to read it and ask themselves whether they'd reach the same unwelcome realisations, too late for convenience.

    Having said that, and having taken note of the date of writing (1999), I do think it reads like a 20th century story, if only because decent modern insulative kit for dinghy sailing need not be as objectionable to wear when one's plan specifically excludes capsizing, as perhaps it was twenty years ago.

    I lately found a photo of myself sailing the Osprey in 2013, in shorts and t-shirt. I didn't think I'd ever been so nonchalant, and I certainly always wear a wetsuit now.

    I've nearly always hoisted a 5-litre air-bottle to the masthead too, to prevent inversion...although naturally, the only time I've capsized, it wasn't rigged. Fortunately in the light conditions, the masthead barely dipped below the surface.

    I'd feel rather astonished if I saw a dinghy sailor wearing a lifejacket, now. Considering the relatively high probability of going swimming from a dinghy, and the combined inconvenience of an inflated LJ, and its uselessness when uninflated, it's a really rotten choice.

    Something that comes across strongly in the 1999 account, is how heavily laden the boat was. I think he said over 40 stone of human ballast; plus several large water and fuel cans, boxes of provisions, (tools? Or did I imagine that?), and, mentioned like an afterthought, an outboard motor! Granted, the Wayfarer carries weight very ably, but in fresh to strong winds and biggish waves, their boat sounded horribly overburdened to me.

    Personally I still find the dinghy-cruising idea appealing, but I think the combination of a basic cabin and a ballasted keel make the cheapest entry-level yachts more practical and pleasing than very heavy, not very sprightly dinghies which won't self-right in the kind of circumstances when the crew is least able to effect a recovery.

    None of that is any wiser than the advice I was given by people here before I bought my Osprey, and it all applies as much now, as then...I still want a yacht, and the dinghy doesn't provide what I wanted from a yacht...

    ...however, owning a big but brisk dinghy myself, I'm better able to stomach purchasing a total slug of a yacht, without feeling I've left all joy of performance behind me.

    Finally, it does occur to me that very small, lightly-ballasted centreboard mini-cruisers are likely to need caution in breezy weather on open water. They may be unsinkable (or nearly so) and they may be far less prone to knock-downs than even the stablest dinghy, but they're still very tiny boats.
    Last edited by dancrane; 13-05-18 at 19:55.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Far S. Cornwall
    Posts
    12,289

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    several for sale on ebay, not too much money. I used to hire one from the Helford boatyard occasionally for our camping up the river holidays. found it very safe and forgiving, unlike the Hornet (no 263) we used to race.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Switzerland. Boat : NE Italy - Adriatic
    Posts
    4,485

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I bought a wooden Wayfarer back in, hmm, must have been 1965, and kept it afloat in Whitby harbour, on a trot just in the corner below the swing-bridge. WYC had decreed the class as a sufficiently robust and stable dinghy for our bay racing off the NE coast but we only managed to get three out together at the most.

    It was only my second boat (first was a Snipe class) and I loved it. I used to get out in the bay as often as possible, mostly single-handed and often had her planing on a broad reach. One gusty evening out alone I capsized and had the devil to get her to not roll over again when righted, full of water. The sealed compartments fore and aft seemed at the time to make her laterally unstable - a veritable roll machine pivoting on those two high buoyancy points - in a seaway and strong winds. Eventually I got her up and headed into the wind and waves and climbed in over the transom, having learned the hard way that trying amidships was just going to roll her again as my weight was enough to start the tipping. I think later models introduced buoyancy bags to fit under the side decks, which must have cured that.

    .
    Last edited by Barnac1e; 14-05-18 at 10:03.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Emsworth Hants
    Posts
    11,873

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I'm not surprised they capsized it looks like inexperience.

    Factors that led to the capsize
    These were:
    a) helming error
    b) sloppy tacking procedure
    c) bad crew co-ordination
    d) the state of the sea and wind

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