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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Keswick, Cumbria
    Posts
    1,540

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by KellysEye View Post
    I'm not surprised they capsized it looks like inexperience.

    Factors that led to the capsize
    These were:
    a) helming error
    b) sloppy tacking procedure
    c) bad crew co-ordination
    d) the state of the sea and wind
    Inexperience?? Did you read the article? That's a lot of dinghy experience there, do you have more than any of them sailing dinghies?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by KellysEye View Post
    I'm not surprised they capsized it looks like inexperience.

    Factors that led to the capsize
    These were:
    a) helming error
    b) sloppy tacking procedure
    c) bad crew co-ordination
    d) the state of the sea and wind
    It seems to me they'd not really prepared the boat properly, with fittings failing.
    Also one of them had poor kit and was getting cold.
    Plus, they were sailing 3-up, in a boat set up for 2-up racing.

    They may have had los of experience, but how much of it turned out to be relevant?
    Not being able to tack effectively because you have an extra person is pretty basic.
    Not having adequate clothing is inexcusable these days, but to be fair the incident was last century.

    I've seen Wayf's racing out of Lymington pretty often. While people bang on about them being excellent sea boats, the reality is, they (and the people in them) struggle more than the higher performance modern boats, when the wind and chop get up.
    I've sailed in that area, capsized dinghies, righted them, then sailed on.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Switzerland. Boat : NE Italy - Adriatic
    Posts
    4,485

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    While people bang on about them being excellent sea boats, the reality is, they (and the people in them) struggle more than the higher performance modern boats, when the wind and chop get up.
    I've sailed in that area, capsized dinghies, righted them, then sailed on.
    I suspect the "excellent sea boats" reputation has much to do with the legendary Frank Dye and his Iceland and Norway exploits. As I found myself and noted from a late reading (after my earlier post) of the linked story, they are not easy to right after a capsize, which should be essential for any dinghy that goes to sea, rather than in protected waters.

    Much as I liked the Wayfarer, I much preferred all my subsequent dinghies: Fireball (particularly), Laser, 470 and lastly, Kestrel. I never capsized the Kestrel, it was almost a ballasted craft with its metal centreplate, but all the others could easily be righted and boarded, unlike the Wayfarer. Or perhaps my early model and relative inexperience, plus a fading memory of half a century ago, colours my perceptions.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    To be fair to the Wayfarer, people who know what they are doing can right them well enough.
    Getting them going again from swamped is more of a problem with some models. Being overloaded with three people, two anchors an outboard etc won't help.
    The dinghy I'd choose for rough conditions would probably be the 505. If you've sailed one in rough water you'll understand why.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    200

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    In terms of Wayfarers being seaworthy, I guess that they would be less tiring over a long passage than a more modern, flightier dinghy. You could probably keep one upright in more marginal conditions (but perhaps less able to keep driving through chop or make headway to windward), but once you go over I would prefer to be in something that comes up dry. Not least because a swamped wayfarer is not very stable, so in my experience it is hard to bail out enough to get sailing before you go over again. On the other hand with a really flighty dinghy you won't be able to climb aboard before it goes over again in really bad conditions.

    Presumably there are lighter, equally stable dinghies out there which aim to fill a similar niche, but which come up dry after a capsize. Probably wouldn't have the same level of stowage though.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Switzerland. Boat : NE Italy - Adriatic
    Posts
    4,485

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    To be fair to the Wayfarer, people who know what they are doing can right them well enough.
    When I wrote that "they are not easy to right after a capsize" I should have written that they are not easy to keep righted after a capsize when full of water, which was my own experience ... although I am quite prepared to admit that I may not have 'known what I was doing' at the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    Getting them going again from swamped is more of a problem with some models.
    I do vividly remember that the bailer was in the foredeck compartment that I dare not open because the swamped boat would have decanted into it. I had to resort to a small, brass pump fitted to the centreboard casing that took ages to clear with no self-bailers. From then on I kept the bailer on a line tied to the mast step.

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    The dinghy I'd choose for rough conditions would probably be the 505. If you've sailed one in rough water you'll understand why.
    I've never sailed a 505, they intimidated me with so much string doing things I had no clue of. They looked far too high-tech for me and far beyond my competence level. The later Fireball was the peak of my dinghy sailing but only on a Swiss lake, so no rough water stuff.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    3,241

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Personally I bought an Albacore in preference to a Wayfarer. Faster, more tweakable, two sails only, much much lighter which means easy to right on your own. The main downside is that it is not as stable as a wayfarer, but not sure how much of an advantage stability is when capsize conditions are reached.Compared to my Phantom, the Albacore is very stable, so it is a relative thing.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,295

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I get observers asking if my Osprey is a Wayfarer. It's a GRP Mk2, and the lines are classic Ian Proctor, very similar in both boats, though the Osprey is 20 inches longer, four inches leaner and at least 70lbs lighter.

    The Osprey comes up from capsize with several inches in the cockpit, but she floated quite high on her side, I guess because the sidedeck tanks are substantial...

    ...having righted the Osp, the process of climbing in over the gunwale precipitated a further capsize, as somebody here said, earlier. I too would climb over the transom if there's a next time; and perhaps there'll be less water sloshed into the cockpit that way.
    Last edited by dancrane; 23-10-18 at 00:15.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,295

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Continuing my Proctor-boat waffle for a bit longer, I was interested one day last summer to find myself a couple of hundred yards behind a Wayfarer with three old chaps in it...

    ...singlehandling the faster Osprey, I was confident that I'd cruise past the laden Wayfarer in seconds. But the minutes went by, and eventually I decided I'd be too far down-tide to get back with ease, if I kept on until I passed them.

    I was going faster, but not very much, considering their weight and mine.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    4,172

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    In contrast to the story off the IOW above, I followed this when it was happening.
    http://www.xtremedinghycruising.com
    A truly stunning adventure achieved in a remarkable time! Also a great advertisement for Wayfarers.
    Allan
    Sailblogs.com search Brilliant with Hilary and Allan as crew.

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