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  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Barnac1e View Post
    When I wrote that "they are not easy to right after a capsize" I should have written that they are not easy to keep righted after a capsize when full of water, which was my own experience ... although I am quite prepared to admit that I may not have 'known what I was doing' at the time.


    I do vividly remember that the bailer was in the foredeck compartment that I dare not open because the swamped boat would have decanted into it. I had to resort to a small, brass pump fitted to the centreboard casing that took ages to clear with no self-bailers. From then on I kept the bailer on a line tied to the mast step.


    I've never sailed a 505, they intimidated me with so much string doing things I had no clue of. They looked far too high-tech for me and far beyond my competence level. The later Fireball was the peak of my dinghy sailing but only on a Swiss lake, so no rough water stuff.
    One method that works righting a swamped boat in waves is to forget the old RYA 'scoop up the crew' method and have the crew hang on the shroud. If you can each end up with an arm around a shroud, the boat is unlikely to re-capsize.
    I've not owned a dinghy without self bailers (or completely self draining) since the mid 70s. ISTM a basic requirement for going to sea.
    The wayfarer (or at least some versions of it) is among the worst boats to sail dry of its era, because it has a big stern tank, which means either no transom flaps at all or they don't work nearly so well.
    I have capsized a Merlin, which has only two pillow sized buoyancy bags at the back. You right it, swim into it and the boat sails uphill leaving the water behind.
    The Merlin is another boat which will look after you, getting you around the course while lesser boats are falling over a lot.
    My 505's were pretty low tech, we're talking about boats bought for 3 figure sums more than 25 years ago! I'd moved from being an inland Fireball crew, to Solent hooliganism.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Allan View Post
    In contrast to the story off the IOW above, I followed this when it was happening.
    http://www.xtremedinghycruising.com
    A truly stunning adventure achieved in a remarkable time! Also a great advertisement for Wayfarers.
    Allan
    Absolutely.
    Considering the fuss people make about rounding GB in a yacht!

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Switzerland. Boat : NE Italy - Adriatic
    Posts
    4,485

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Allan View Post
    In contrast to the story off the IOW above, I followed this when it was happening.
    http://www.xtremedinghycruising.com
    A truly stunning adventure achieved in a remarkable time! Also a great advertisement for Wayfarers.
    Allan
    As to my Frank Dye allusion earlier I obtained the the loan of the cruise to Norway film for my yacht club back in the 1960s that clinched the choice for our dinghy class. For those that can tolerate the low-tech footage, it is here.

    From the explanatory YouTube description: "This old film documents the Norwegian Sea crossing from Scotland to Aalesund, Norway, by Frank Dye and his crew, Bill Brockbank aboard a Wayfarer sailing dinghy. They encountered a Force 9 storm during the passage, survived four capsizes and a broken mast. It is a remarkable feat of dinghy sailing."

    .
    Last edited by Barnac1e; 16-05-18 at 06:12.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Campbeltown
    Posts
    1,549

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Capsize is not mentioned on UKWA site, although we know the Clubs of the Assn carry out capsize drills in millpond conditions. These will be a vital first start. But since the W is promoted as a serious cruiser then maybe the training should extend to sea conditions, albeit with safety RIB in attendance. Perhaps 2 or 3 crews might have a go at each session?
    Blow wind, rise storm,
    Ship ashore before dawn.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by EdWingfield View Post
    Capsize is not mentioned on UKWA site, although we know the Clubs of the Assn carry out capsize drills in millpond conditions. These will be a vital first start. But since the W is promoted as a serious cruiser then maybe the training should extend to sea conditions, albeit with safety RIB in attendance. Perhaps 2 or 3 crews might have a go at each session?
    I think when you add loads of weight and a third person, it's really up to you to make your own calls on how to handle the boat.
    You could practise with a standard Wayfarer in normal racing conditions as much as you want, it will be different with an overweight boat out in a blow near the Needles.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Hi all, I've begun having loads of fun sailing my new (to me) wayfarer, but I'm looking for some rudder maintenance advice. In particular the bit where the downhall attaches has got wet inside and expanded, making the up/down pivot very stiff. What's the best remedy? I'm guessing I need to treat it somehow to stop the rot, then sand that entire area to make it thinner (so pivot isn't stiff) then revarnish the sanded area. Any tips or advice re what vanish to use?

    Photos



  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,629

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I take it you've tried slackening off the pivot bolt a bit?
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Good idea - that makes it much better! It's still sticking though due to the bit where the downhaul attaches being swollen.

    More generally, my long-term goal is to properly look after a wooden boat, and since this is the only wooden component of my current and first boat, I'd like to start as I mean to go on by properly looking after this rudder. But this might be the wrong thread for such a query...

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,128

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I would epoxy the area around the downhaul, after drying thoroughly.
    You'll need to sand it all flat and paralllel afterwards.
    Opinions differ on varnish, best to stick with whats been used before to some extent.
    International one-pot polyurethane is a good all round choice for this sort of thing.

    I'd guess the centreboard might also be wood, tends to be out of sight, out of mind, but needs looking after.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Over here
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    To solve the wetness, bring the rudder home, remove the downhaul, sand the varnish off to bare wood around the hole and leave lying around your warm house for few weeks till properly dried out. Then revarnish, including getting into the hole. If you chose to epoxy the blade, you will need to take whole board back to bare wood.

    Once done, reassemble and enjoy.

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