Page 7 of 12 FirstFirst ... 234567891011 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 120
  1. #61
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,136

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelpie View Post
    The traveller went a bit out of fashion a few years ago, as you can achieve the same result more simply using a more powerful kicker, with the mainsheet on a bridle.
    Agreed.
    Unless you have a weak and/wooden boom, fit a good kicker, a cascade of blocks giving about 16:1 is good.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,297

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    That's all very helpful.

    I've been allowing myself to believe that my traveller, which operates easily, but hasn't been used in anger, is a great way to reduce heeling (at cost to pointing) in a breeze. Does the modern powerful kicker replicate this heeling-reduction effect?

    Regarding the new mainsail question, I too am tempted, but it would cost nearly three times what I paid for the boat.

    I could be persuaded to shell out, but I think I'd have to spend at least as much again on pristine new foils and hull-polishing, to make the first purchase seem rational.

    At the moment the whole boat is old and tired, and adding a brand new sail will tend to make the rest look and feel worse than it is!
    Last edited by dancrane; 06-07-18 at 10:55.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,136

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    If the old sail is really working against you, unless you are going to enter the Nationals, first thing to look at is secondhand sails from the top racers.
    I've been using a main I bought secondhand for under 100, I've won plenty of club handicap races with it over the last 4 seasons or so.
    Jibs don't last as long, but the top racers will sell them after half a season's use. Most class association websites have sails for sale.

    The thing with sheets, travellers and kickers, is being able to let the sail out a bit without letting the boom rise and opening the leech when you don't want to.
    There is what I call 'yacht style' where the main does leech tension on a beat and the horizontal angle is done by the traveller. Some dinghies use this to great effect, but it means playing the traveller for every gust. Sometimes the crew does it.
    The more usual is to have the mainsheet working from a point high up, like a bridle at the stern or a hoop in the middle, the mainsheet is then mostly doing horizontal angle, and the kicker does leech tension.
    Some boats, particularly in lighter air, the main on the hoop also does leech tension, so the first ease affects most the top of the sail, but then the kicker goes tight and further easing lets the boom out horizontally. Getting the compromise right means you don't have to continually fiddle with both controls for every puff or wave.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,629

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    That's all very helpful.

    I've been allowing myself to believe that my traveller, which operates easily, but hasn't used in anger, is a great way to reduce heeling (at cost to pointing) in a breeze. Does the modern powerful kicker replicate this heeling-reduction effect?

    Regarding the new mainsail question, I too am tempted, but it would cost nearly three times what I bought the boat for.

    I could be persuaded to shell out, but I think I'd have to spend at least as much again on pristine new foils and hull-polishing, to make the first purchase seem rational.

    At the moment the whole boat is old and tired, and adding a brand new sail will tend to make the rest look and feel worse than it is!
    I don't know if things are different on your Osprey, but in general a kicker or traveller is used to adjust sail shape independently of the sheeting angle. Dumping the traveler is a good technique on a yacht to maintain speed through gusts, but on a dinghy where you have the sheet in your hand it probably makes more sense to use that.
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,297

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Thanks for your replies gents. Great tip about getting newish sails at significant reduction. Just as long as the hard-driving crews at the top of their game haven't pulled the shape out of the sail in half a dozen breezy races.

    I've tended to treat the Osprey like a yacht, albeit a very tender one. Singlehanding her, it's a rare day that I can keep her close to upright upwind, so I'm inclined to accept flat tacks and leeway rather than press her hard and heel unproductively.

    I've always supposed that a taut kicker (and cunningham) flattens the sail, reducing heel by some mysterious physics I don't pretend to comprehend...

    ...while the traveller offsets the angle to the wind, such that even with the mainsheet in tight, the drive of the sail is pointing more ahead than sideways, hence benefiting drive and reducing heeling, at cost to pointing.

    Thinking back, it's only been the last couple of years that I adjusted the traveller at all, and it hasn't helped as far as I could see. I'll centre it and work the kicker instead.

    Edit:

    Kelpie has below answered the question to my satisfaction - I'm just too light, so I must live with what I can't do. That's fine.

    If anyone is wondering what happened to the Wayfarer theme, I must remind them how very similar visually, the Mk 2 Osprey is to the Wayfarer...both immediately obvious as Ian Proctor's work. Here's a Wayf singlehander suffering, much as I do in the longer Osprey...

    Last edited by dancrane; 06-07-18 at 11:56.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Loch Snizort, Isle of Skye
    Posts
    4,629

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    The other thing to bear in mind is that beyond a certain wind speed you simply will not be able to sail the boat efficiently, unless you bring some extra ballast with you. This is one of the reasons I switched from my Wayfarer to a Wanderer for singlehanding- I just couldn't keep the bigger boat flat in stronger winds, and had to either dump the main or reef, both of which pretty much destroy your pointing ability.
    Deb 33- Wayfarer- Wanderer

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    I'm thinking of replacing my toe straps because they are 60% worn through under the thwart and it makes me nervous using them! (also need to try to work out what sharp edge has caused them to wear in exactly that place and cover it somehow)

    I also want to add removable miniature toe straps that go above the bench forward of the thwart, for small children to use (for fun rather than improved sailing performance)

    My question: is there any actual difference between the toe straps sold by chandlers for this purpose, and generic polypropylene webbing strap such as this https://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/webbing-strap ?

  8. #68
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    33,136

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    If you buy pre-made toe straps for a dinghy these days, you normally expect foam padding on the underside.
    If you buy webbing off the roll for the purpose in a chandler's, it's normally very thick, so it can be made to stand up in a loop and you can get your toes under easily.
    Thin webbing, like car seat belt or thinner, is amply strong, but tends to fold rather than hold its shape. That is generally very uncomfortable after about 30 seconds, even with protection from wetsuit boots.
    Some people use the webbing from lifting strops.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,297

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    Quote Originally Posted by sillyboxes View Post
    I'm thinking of replacing my toe straps...also need to try to work out what sharp edge has caused them to wear in exactly that place and cover it somehow.
    I've always used ordinary 50mm seat-belt webbing such as in your link. I've never found it uncomfortable, but getting it to the right height ready for action requires some shockcord keeping the top of the triangle approximately where I stick my ankles.

    Difficult to imagine what's caused such wear-damage to your existing toestraps, unless they're ancient - it's very durable stuff. I've found that the structures to which the webbing is attached are far more likely to be in danger of sudden catastrophic failure.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    27,573

    Default Re: Wayfarer - great little boat

    In my dinghy racing days it was standard to use simple webbing - just like a car seatbelt - held by 2 screws / bolts through a Seasure stainless plate each end, and held up in the middle or anywhere handy by elastic to an eye under a thwart.

    As an Osprey fan I'm a little upset by the comment they look similar to Wayfarers, nothing like; Wayfarer - Thunderbird 2 heavy ( in every way ) lifter - Osprey - Thunderbird 1 high speed performance treasure to behold and sail.

    I do admire Wayfarers enormously, but can't help thinking of them as sailing school boats, as they can carry a lot of people and it needs them to get up a slipway like ours - maybe I was younger fitter and keener when I had my Osprey but it didn't seem to need anywhere the effort - though both certainly need jockey wheels on the trolleys.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

Page 7 of 12 FirstFirst ... 234567891011 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to