Six tidal lagoons across the UK aim to generate 8% of the country’s electricity

Plans for a fleet of tidal lagoons across the UK have been unveiled by a company called Tidal Lagoon Power.

The six lagoons, four in Wales, one in Somerset and one in Cumbria, aim to produce 8% of the UK’s electricity for 120 years.

Tidal Lagoon Power has already submitted a planning application for the first pioneering site in Swansea, with a decision due this June. The scheme was developed to establish a scalable blueprint for the sector.

Tidal lagoons

Credit: Tidal Lagoon Power

Taking significant steps towards the delivery of full-scale tidal lagoon infrastructure in the UK, they’ve now submitted an Environmental Impact Assessment scoping report for a tidal lagoon power plant between Cardiff and Newport.

Plans include up to 90 turbines within a 22km breakwater that will harness the power of rising and falling tides to provide electricity to every home in Wales.

Tidal lagoons

Credit: Tidal Lagoon Power

The lagoon, which has a design life of 120 years, would generate power for approximately 14 hours each day and potentially be powered on in 2022.

Tidal Lagoon Power has also confirmed that early feasibility and engagement work is underway regarding the delivery of four other full-scale tidal lagoons in Newport, West Cumbria, Colwyn Bay and Bridgewater Bay.

CEO Mark Shorrock said: “Full-scale tidal lagoon infrastructure gives the UK an opportunity to generate electricity from our amazing tidal range at a cost comparable to fossil fuel or nuclear generation.  We have the best tidal resource in Europe and the second best worldwide.  We now have a sustainable way to make the most of this natural advantage.

“We will build on the template established for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon – applying the expertise and learning, scaling the UK supply chain and Turbine Assembly Plant, leveraging the institutional investor partnerships we have developed – to deliver a Cardiff Tidal Lagoon capable of working in harmony with nature to supply around 1.5 million UK homes, now and for generations to come, with affordable, reliable, low carbon electricity.

“There is still a long way to go and many environmental surveys to undertake but we will work in partnership with all nature conservation bodies so as to understand, avoid, minimise and mitigate any environmental impacts.”

The firm expects to submit a full planning application for Tidal Lagoon Cardiff in 2017, with a decision expected in 2018.

  • John Dowling

    The relatively small amounts of electricity generated by the Swansea project will cost 3 to 4 times that by a gas-fired station, which are built at a fraction of the cost. There is no technical or financial justification for these white elephants, it is all about politics.

  • Shane Kennedy

    There are lots of places where there is a natural bay that would work well. Milford Haven/Pembroke River is one that commes to mind. With a narrow entrance, and minimal use by boaters, it seems ideal.